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snom ONE on Linux : High Availability


Jeremy Salmon
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Hi,

 

I just installed snom ONE on a hight availability cluster.

 

My configuration

 

 

A shared IP between 2 box (ex : 192.168.1.83)

 

Box 1 (192.168.1.81)
    - Linux Debian 6.x
    - snom ONE with /etc/init.d/snomONE updated to make it LSB compliant
    - DRBD for HDD replication to Box 2
    - Corosync + Pacemaker for failover management
    - Dhcpd

Box 2 (192.168.1.82)
    - Linux Debian 6.x
    - snom ONE with /etc/init.d/snomONE updated to make it LSB compliant
    - DRBD for HDD replication to Box 1
    - Corosync + Pacemaker for failover management
    - Dhcpd

 

Patton gateway to connect to Telco.

 

Everything work well with a Grey (free) édition.

Services toggle between Box 1 and Box 2 in case of fail of network or anything else.

Phones and Gateway are registered to 192.168.1.83.

 

But now I want to activate a Blue licence.

 

Is there a solution for this type of solution or should I install 2 licenses?

 

Regards,

 

Jeremy

 

PS : A tutorial will be published quickly on http://blog.snom.ma.

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Guest kevin

You could potentially have an issue when the 2nd server comes online and tries to activate the license since that license is already activated. It may work if the outage is a short time but for a blue license we would recommend a virtual machine for redundancy and fail-over.

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I dont think this is a license problem. We tried a similar setup some time ago with "mixed" results. I agree the solution of the virtual IP address is the right way to go; however you must pay attention to the routing and make sure that the PBX uses the right (virtual) IP address when failing over. At the end of the day, the failover time is far longer than with a virtual machine, where registrations stay up, and calls dont get dropped during the failover. Anyway, the automated failover may help to provide a simple solution.

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Guest kevin

The idea is that you set up the virtual machines in a redundant fashion. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732181(v=ws.10).aspx talks about how to do it in HyperV but Xen and Vmware can do this as well. It is alot cleaner than trying to setup two systems with a heartbeat. That was really the old way to do it before VM's became prevalent and take a lot of the pain out of it.

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